Episode 14 – The Tire Ordeal part 2

Part 2 of the tire ordeal. I’m not out of the woods (desert) yet!

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Episode 5 – Offroading, hot springs and friends

Here’s the next one. A shorty … taking some zeros with friends and my beloved Catmobile. Thank you, my readers for coming on my journey with me. XOXO

To hell and back before breakfast.

A long day today. Sunrise at the gaging station. we get ourselves ready for the day by blowing on our fingers to keep them warm. Winter morning in the desert. How funny to think the next time we’ll be here we might be running from shade to shade and wishing for just a small reprieve from the heat.

Sunrise through Hippie’s truck back window

And speaking of heat. Our first act of business today was to go to Hell. When I pointed the town on the map to Hippie, she said “oh, we’re going to Hell. I don’t care if it’s out of the way.” But by exit 121, past it, there was still no sign of Hell. Google lady to the rescue. Hell was founded in the 1950s, population: 3 – You were expecting more, I know. The 3 poor souls were a husband, his wife and their son. The husband was the mayor, president of the chamber of commerce, owner of the gas station and of beer tavern that constituted the whole town. No mention of what titles the other family members held. The family abandoned the town in the early 60s, because a new faster road detoured visitors away from Hell. A few years later, Hell was burned down, as you’d expect, to make way for the new interstate I10. The lady Google speculates that the name remains on the map mostly for the enjoyment of LA news reporters, for article titles such as “Los Angeles hotter than Hell”, “It’s snowing in Hell.” etc … These are actual article titles from the past few years.

Since Hell was no longer available, we drove north to Nothing. Not an actual name, but an accurate depiction of an abstract concept. Nothing. I’m sure once we’re walking, the rhythm of our legs will reveal the rich life and details of the Mojave. But at driving speed, the prospect of those valley crossings is daunting. Nothing. No water, no plants, no shade. Just dirt, mud in places because it rained and more nothing. Then more vegetation, small shrubs, with just enough shade for maybe a skinny lizard. Then slightly taller creosote bushes, with just enough shade to be a tease. We might have to night hike that section. I bought ultra violet scorpion lights. Those who know me know I loooooove love love the desert. It’s one of the few places in the world big enough to hold Freedom – another abstract concept. But I’ll admit, I suddenly felt intimidated. I’m still going to walk it, of course, but it really put in perspective why only 2 people have thru-hiked this trail before. It takes a certain kind of …

… madness

We dropped about 20 gallons of water in the Mojave National Preserve, most of them at road crossings, easy to access. Dirtmonger, who hiked the trail last year, gave us his GPS waypoints, making the water caching task more akin to a fun treasure hunt with maps than the painstaking planning on a computer screen he must have done to get these points. Thank you Dirtmonger!!!

After the great stretch of Nothing, we climbed up to a land of Joshua trees dusted in snow and eventually pinon pines. Water puddles on the road were rimmed with ice, all visitor centers were closed, and the brief excursion I took outside the truck to get a photo of a cool tree froze my finger tips – well, not really, but as a shock to the system from the warm cab of the truck, and with the added exaggeration factor for storytelling, it was pretty close to that.

Now we’re all done with the Mojave. Tomorrow, off to my beloved Death Valley. But we start the day at the Tecopa hot springs, so who knows how much we will actually get done.

Hot springs … woooo!

Sunset on our way to the Tecopa hot springs.

Thank you for reading.
Love!

Hippie and the Bobcat.